Pre-Conference Symposia (ISC)

Updated:Sep 30,2014
International Stroke Conference 2015 - Sessions February 11-13

Pre-Conference Symposia

This Pre-Conference Symposium of the International Stroke Conference is designed to provide cutting edge information for healthcare professionals caring for patients with, or at risk for stroke. This one-day symposium highlights scientific advances in cerebrovascular disease while emphasizing their application in the real world. The symposium informs the audience about issues along the full continuum of stroke care and covers varied topics of interest to healthcare providers working in the emergency department, hospitalist settings, primary care, general neurology, pharmacies, and other stroke care arenas. This year’s symposium will focus on the challenges in inpatient stroke care including: justifying investigations and interpreting findings in the stroke workup; the timing of CEA; blood pressure management in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke; optimizing inpatient stroke care; maximizing early rehabilitation; prognosis after stroke; and maximizing stroke prevention. There will also be a series of challenging interactive breakout sessions. Participants will also have the opportunity to have an informal lunch with the faculty where questions or challenging stroke cases may be discussed.


Pre-Conference Symposium I Programming   |   Learning Objectives   |   Program Committee
CME Information


ISC 2015 Pre-Conference Symposium I: Stroke in the Real World - Working Man Blues: Challenges in Inpatient Stroke Care

Tuesday, Feb 10
9:00 am – 5:15 pm

9:00 am – 12 Noon

Moderators:     Theodore Wein, MD, FRCPC, FAHA, Montreal, QC, Canada
                        David Likosky, MD, Kirkland, WA

9:00    Lord, I Hope This Day Is Good
         
Kyra Becker, MD, FAHA, Seattle, WA

9:05    Every Time Two Fools Collide: Justifying Investigations in the Stroke Workup (Maximum)
         
Lee H Schwamm, MD, FAHA, Boston, MA

9:25    Every Time Two Fools Collide: Justifying Investigations in the Stroke Workup (Minimum)
         
William J Powers, MD, FAHA, Chapel Hill, NC

9:45    Q&A

9:55    What Kind of Fool Do You Think I Am? Interpreting Findings in the Stroke Workup  
          
James F Meschia, MD, FAHA, Jacksonville, FL 

10:40  Q&A

10:45  If the Devil Danced: Timing of CEA
          
Thomas G Brott, MD, Jacksonville, FL

11:15 Q&A
 
11:20  Don't Rock the Jukebox: Blood Pressure Management in Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke
          
Philip M Bath, BSc, MB, BS, MD, FRCPath, FRCP, FESC, Nottingham, United Kingdom

11:50 Q&A

12 Noon – 1:00 pm
Lunch with the Faculty: Ask Your Questions
All Faculty (A boxed lunch will be provided.)
 
Moderators:     Howard Kirshner, MD, FAHA, Nashville, TN
                        Brett M Kissela, MD, MS, Cincinnati, OH

1:00   I Walk the Line: Inpatient Stroke Care - Practical Issues
         Sharon Poisson, MD, Aurora, CO

1:30 Q&A

1:40 pm – 2:20 pm  Concurrent Sessions

   Concurrent IA: Blood Red and Goin’ Down: When to Anti-coagulate - Common Scenarios
   Jonathan Rosand, MD, Boston, MA  
  
   Concurrent IB: Stand by Your Man: Managing and Treating the Neurologically Deteriorating Patient
  
Thorsten G Steiner, MD, PhD, Heidelberg, Germany

   Concurrent IC: Take This Job and Shove It: Challenging Consultations in Stroke Care
  
David Likosky, MD, Kirkland, WA

   Concurrent ID: Always on My Mind: Common Clinical Dilemmas Regarding Antithrombotic Agents
  

2:25 pm – 3:10 pm  Concurrent Sessions

   Concurrent IIA: Blood Red and Goin’ Down: When to Anti-coagulate - Common Scenarios
   Jonathan Rosand, MD, Boston, MA

   Concurrent IIB: Stand by Your Man: Managing and Treating the Neurologically Deteriorating Patient
  
Thorsten G Steiner, MD, PhD, Heidelberg, Germany

   Concurrent IIC: Take This Job and Shove It: Challenging Consultations in Stroke Care
  
David Likosky, MD, Kirkland, WA

   Concurrent IID: Always on My Mind: Common Clinical Dilemmas Regarding Antithrombotic Agents
  

3:20    He’ll Have to Go: Maximizing Early Rehabilitation in the Acute Setting and Key Steps in Transition of Care
          
Pamela W Duncan, PhD, FAPTA, FAHA, Winston-Salem, NC

3:45    Q&A

3:50    If Bubba Can Dance, I Can, Too: Prognosis after Stroke
         
Claire Creutzfeldt, MD, Seattle, WA

4:20   Q&A

4:25    Don't Happen Twice: Maximizing Stroke Prevention
          
Ralph L Sacco, MS, MD, FAHA, FAAN, Miami, FL

5:05    Q&A

5:10    What a Difference You've Made in My Life
          
Bruce Ovbiagele, MD, MSc, FAHA, Charleston, SC


Please note that there is a separate registration fee to attend the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium.


 
Learning Objectives

After participating in this activity, participants will be able to: 

 

  • Assess and justify investigations in the stroke workup
  • Interpret findings in the stroke workup
  • Discuss the timing of CEA
  • Optimize blood pressure management in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke
  • Identify the practical issues of inpatient stroke care
  • Establish how to maximize early rehabilitation in the acute setting and key steps in the transition of care
  • Describe how to determine the prognosis after stroke
  • Recommend how to maximize stroke prevention
  • Specify:
         When to anti-coagulate
         How to manage and treat the neurologically deteriorating patient
         Challenging consultations in stroke care
         Common clinical dilemmas regarding antithrombotic agents

     

Pre-Con I Program Committee

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is grateful to the members of the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium I 2015 Program Committee for their dedication and leadership provided throughout the year in planning the program:

Ted Wein, MD, FRCPC, FAHA, Chair
Andy Josephson, MD
Howard Kirshner, MD, FAHA
Brett M. Kissela, MD, MS
David Likosky, MD
Kyra Becker, MD, FAHA (ISC Program Committee, Chair)
Bruce Ovbiagele, MD, MSc, FAHA (ISC Program Committee, Vice Chair)


 
ISC PRE-CONFERENCE SYMPOSIUM II: (STUDENT/TRAINEE/EARLY CAREER): EMERGING TRENDS FOR STROKE TRIALS, BIOMARKERS, ADAPTIVE TRIAL DESIGN, REPAIR TRIALS, AND NEW ENDPOINTS

Clinical trials in stroke are taking new directions. Based on new ideas in clinical trial design, and spurred in part by past failures in the field, clinical trials are now taking advantage of adaptive trial design, new outcome measures, and imaging and serum biomarkers. Goals are to enhance the ability of early stage trials to determine dose, detect efficacy, or exclude futility; and for later stage trials to choose optimal endpoints for functional recovery that reflect initial neuroprotective or delayed tissue repair therapies.

This pre-conference course will focus on new developments in clinical trial design in stroke. The topics include adaptive trial design, design of neural repair trials in stroke, Phase 2 Biomarker endpoints, approaches to consent in acute stroke trials, and critical examination of endpoint analyses in stroke. The goal is for the junior faculty, trainee or investigator to gain an understanding of new ways to test therapies in stroke and to discuss these principles as they are evolving with experts in the field.

Pre-Conference Symposium II Programming   |   Learning Objectives   |   Program Committee
CME Information


ISC 2015 Pre-Con Symposium II (Student/Trainee/Early Career): Emerging Trends for Stroke Trials: Biomarkers, Adaptive Trial Design, Repair Trials, and New Endpoints


Moderator: S Thomas Carmichael, MD, PhD, Los Angeles, CA

1:00   Adaptive Trial Design
         
Sharon D Yeatts, PhD, Charleston, SC
         Ying Kuen K Cheung, PhD, New York, NY

1:35   Discussion

1:45   Appropriate Design/Endpoints for Neural Repair Trials
         
Steven C Cramer, MD, Orange, CA

2:20   Discussion

2:30
   Phase 2 Trial Biomarker Endpoint Designs
         Christian Foerch, MD, Frankfurt, Germany

3:05   Discussion

3:15   Approaches to Consent in Acute Trials including EFIC and Short?form Consents
        
 Jeffrey L Saver, MD, FAHA, Los Angeles, CA

3:50   Discussion

4:00   Control Rate Preservation and Composite Endpoints in Prevention Trials 
          
Philip M Bath, BSc, MB, BS, MD, FRCPath, FRCP, FESC, Nottingham, United Kingdom 

4:35   Discussion

4:45   General Discussion

Please note that there is a separate registration fee to attend the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium.


 Learning Objectives

After participating in this activity, participants will be able to:
  • Cite the goals in adaptive trial design 
  • Identify the appropriate design/endpoints for neural repair trials
  • Explain phase 2 trial biomarker endpoint designs
  • Discuss the approaches to consent in acute trials including EFIC and short?form consents
  • Describe the control rate preservation and composite endpoints in prevention trials

 Pre-Con II Program Committee

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is grateful to the members of the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium II 2015 Program Committee for their dedication and leadership provided throughout the year in planning the program:

S Thomas Carmichael, MD, PhD, Chair
Kyra Becker, MD, FAHA (ISC Program Committee, Chair)
Bruce Ovbiagele, MD, MSc, FAHA (ISC Program Committee, Vice Chair)


CME Information

Continuing Medical Education Accreditation - Physicians
The American Heart Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Continuing Medical Education Accreditation – Physician Assistants
AAPA accepts Category I credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME.
 
All persons who develop and/or control educational content in CME/CE activities sponsored by the American Heart Association will disclose to the audience all financial relationships with any commercial supporters of this activity as well as with other commercial interests whose lines of business are related to the CME/CE-certified content of this activity. In addition, presenters will disclose unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices discussed in their presentations. Such disclosures will be made in writing in course presentation materials.